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The Lakes Of The Lake District

If you ever plan on taking a journey to England; one of the most pristine places, full of natural beauty; that you will ever lay your eyes upon is in the area known as the Lake DistrictThe Lake District is surrounded on four sides with various lakes and streams for those that love the outdoors.  There's fishing and sailing; as well as, more widely water sports like surfing and canoeing.  Visitors have been coming to the Lake District for centuries to take in the beauty and the recreational activities.  The lakes of the Lake District can be split into four basic areas.  All of these areas share the same common denominator of being naturally appealing; however, each do have their own unique style and calling.
North Lakes of the Lake District
The northern lakes of the Lake District cover much of the infamous national park that calls the Lake District home; the northern lakes are nestled in beauty.  Those visiting on holiday are blown away at the unique views.  Tall mountain peaks serve as back-drops for the lower lying valleys that cover the land in the northern Lake District area.  These huge mountains were carved out from icebergs that swept through this region thousands of years ago; creating a picturesque environment.  Perhaps the only thing as ravishing as the landscape views is the northern lakes of the Lake District.  One such lake of the Lake District is known to many as Derwent Water.  This is the widest lake in all of England; at approximately 1.5 miles wide; from there it stretches for 3 miles long.  Unfortunately, this lake lacks depth; at only 80-90 feet at it's deepest- the lake is known to freeze over quiet often in the winter months.  Another shallow lake of the Lake District on the northern side is called Bassenthwaite Lake.  This lake is only 70 feet deep at its deepest; however, overall- it's considered one of the largest lakes of the Lake District and all of England- reaching nearly 4 miles long and three quarter of a mile wide.  One of the most visited lakes of the Lake District is that called Crummock Water; a very large lake with great depth.  More importantly, this lake of the Lake District is fed with the largest waterfall in all of England, the Scale Force, and a 170-foot downward flowing waterfall. 
Another interesting Lake of the Lake District is known to residents as Loweswater; unlike other lakes of the Lake District; this lake flows toward the center of the Lake District; as well, it is surrounded by beautiful trees and rolling hills.  Elterwater is the smallest of the 16 lakes of the Lake District; it is only a half of a mile long.  However, it is home to a multitude of wildlife, especially birds- the most popular, the swan; Elterwater's namesake. 
South Lakes of the Lake District
There are five southern lakes of the Lake District; these lakes are considered the mouth to the national park located in this area.  The most well-known lake of the Lake District is located in the southern area, Lake Windemere.  It's considered a great tourist destination; it's England's largest natural lakes, nearly 11 miles long and 1 mile wide.  As well, the depth of Lake Windemere reaches 225 feet in some places.  Unlike the lakes of the Lake District to the north; these southern lakes of the Lake District are usually flooded with sailing vessels.  Those that visit will likely see steamers, yachts, and cruising vessels.  There are ferries that will gladly haul families around the lake; as well, Lake Windemere is the only lake of the Lake District that has a functioning car ferry.  There are several other smaller southern lakes of the Lake District that feature great canoeing and scenic routes; families and adventure goers have long journey down these southern lakes in the Lake District for hundreds of years.
Western Lakes of the Lake District
Fertile land and soil can be found throughout the Lake District; the land lying along the western side of the Lake District is less populated; therefore offering great opportunities for farmland.  The valleys that sit in the western part of the Lake District are surrounded by beautiful mountains and three known lakes.  Buttermere is a smaller lake that sits on the western side of the Lake District; although small and shallow- it is often home to those that enjoy wind-surfing, canoeing, and boating in smaller vessels.  Ennerdale Water is another western lake of the Lake District; perhaps not as well known as other lakes of the Lake District; however, it is the underlying lake to famous mountain peaks, such as Green Gable and Great Gable.
Eastern Lakes of the Lake District
There are only two lakes situated on the eastern side of the Lake District; those that reside in England recognize the eastern side of the Lake District as a great spot for weekend get-a-ways and short holidays.  Although, not commercialized to the entire world like other Lake District areas; the eastern side of the Lake District does offer those visiting a great spot to relax and enjoy the scenery and the second largest lake of the Lake District; UllswaterUllswater is almost 9 miles long and those that visit this lake will find boats galore on the water.  Currently, there are 6 steamers that operate on Ullswater; as well, holiday goers will most likely find motor and rowing boats atop the water.  
Regardless of the lake you visit in the Lake District; you’re sure to find plenty of exciting adventures awaiting you.  Most of the lakes allow for boating, fishing, and swimming.  As well, most of the lakes are located near clean and comfortable accommodations.  Besides visiting the Lakes of the Lake District; you will also find other great activities to do.  The entire region also offers over 200 beautiful mountain summits; most with trails and paths available for hiking.